(+372) 6 31 38 36   info@pvxmusic.ee

0item(s)

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Product was successfully added to your shopping cart.

 

 

Audix Nominated for Mic Line of the Year Award

Audix is honored to be nominated for Microphone Line of the Year in the MMR Dealers' Choice Awards! The nomination comes from MMR Magazine subscribers, primarily retail dealers in the music industry. MMR goes out to more than 8,400 retailers in the USA and 3,000 retailers worldwide.

For more than 30 years, Audix has proudly served the professional audio industry with high performance and innovative products. A walk through our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Wilsonville, Oregon demonstrates a commitment to precision, quality and innovation.

Whether in the studio, on stage or in the corporate boardroom, Audix microphones perform beyond your expectations.

Taylor 214ce DLX 

Alun Lower gets to grips with a relatively entry level Taylor – and one with bags of high-end appeal and the new Expression System 2 pickup

taylor2

Taylor’s 200 series has long represented an affordable gateway into the company’s extensive and ever-desirable range of instruments. But while these guitars have always boasted wonderful tones and playability, their looks alone have always edged more towards the simpler, less glamorous end of the spectrum. So Taylor has naturally taken the logical step and given the 200 series a bit of shake in order to up their visual desirability. The sticking point, however, is balancing the visual embellishments with the guitar’s overall value. At 1399 euro, that’s a tricky thing to do, and the natural question to arise is just how much can you charge for a guitar that technically features laminate wood back and sides?

Build quality

One thing’s for sure, that laminate wood – or layered – construction is just about the only contentious point to be found anywhere in the construction of the 214ce DLX. A relatively “entry-level” guitar this may be, but it’s the archetypal Taylor in so many ways and as a guitar geek I can’t help but feel an awful lot of fondness for it straight away. Much like the regular 214ce, you’ve got a classic combination of solid Sitka spruce and layered rosewood, partnered with a sapele neck topped with an ebony fingerboard and a rosewood veneer on the face of the headstock. This DLX model also sports a slightly flatter, Venetian-style cutaway – a neat little difference on the higher end models that looks pretty smart and modern.

It’s not long before the rest of the DLX’s premier appointments begin to make themselves known. For starters, there’s the finishing. Where the regular 214 features a satin coat across the neck, back and sides of the body, the DLX features an upgraded gloss finish across the entire body and a more open, porous satin finish on the neck for a nicely tactile, natural feel. It sounds frivolous on paper, but in the hand, the guitar really does feel like a step up and the neck undoubtedly benefits from a greater playing experience. Other cosmetic touches include the upgrade to small diamond inlays, and a rosewood truss rod cover. The back has also been upgraded from a single-piece laminate wood to a two-piece, upping the visual appeal in line with the 300 series. The tuners have also received a slight upgrade from die-cast chrome to 100/200 chrome.

taylor

 

Overall construction quality is as good as it’s ever been with Taylor. For a guitar with laminate wood, I’d have a hard time figuring that out without looking at the spec sheets, and it plays as well as any guitar costing in the region of £1,000 that you’re ever likely to try with solid back and sides. Intonation and tuning stability are exceptional even at this relatively low price point too. There really isn’t anything to complain about – and the laminate or layered wood construction of the back and sides really makes no difference to the ear.

The biggest change to the guitar arguably comes in the form of the electronics, which have received an upgrade to the Expression System 2. This is actually a pretty big upgrade, being the system that appears on a large number of Taylor’s higher end instruments as opposed to the ES-T, which appears on Taylor’s lower end instruments such as the GS-Mini and 100 Series. It’s this feature that marks the DLX a massive upgrade over the standard version.

Sound quality

Acoustically, the DLX really does sound excellent. The tone sits squarely in between the full depth and dynamics of a dreadnaught and the tighter, more pronounced punch you get from smaller bodied instruments. It’s balance personified – and exactly why after years of reviewing guitars it’s fast become my favourite body shape for an all-rounder. The low-end is satisfyingly plummy when fingerpicked or as crisp as a cool autumn evening when flat-picked. Highs are bright and well-defined but lack perhaps a touch of harmonic complexity when put under the microscope – though all but the most experienced of ears will struggle to pick this out. On the flipside, the laminate wood construction aids projection well and results in a guitar that sounds great from the off but that will probably not mature in quite the same way as some of its rivals.

Really, this is the only place that the 214ce starts to struggle ever so slightly. The truth is that there are some fantastic guitars out there for £1,000 and under including the likes of Larrivée, Yamaha, Martin, and Faith (among others). Most of these rivals feature solid-construction too, adding the possibility of your tone improving and maturing over time as the wood ages and settles. This is an advantage that no layered wood guitar will ever truly trump in terms of outright acoustic performance, but the DLX does come very close indeed.

taylor1

Plugged-in performance is where the Taylor picks up some of the slack – the tone is dependable and solid, offering a decent amount of adjustment and clarity. It’s an excellent reproduction of the guitar’s natural tone that proves this is a guitar that will see you through any gig and adapt itself to a million different applications. The ES2 is a revolutionary pickup design that reflects Taylor’s perennial innovation in acoustic guitar amplification. The soul of the ES2 is Taylor’s patented behind-the-saddle pickup, which features three uniquely positioned and individually calibrated pickup sensors. According to Taylor, the location of the sensors enables a more dynamic range of acoustic sound to be captured than ever before. Together with Taylor’s custom-designed “professional audio”-grade preamp, this system produces exceptional amplified tone and responsiveness – team this with the trusted construction, hard case, and the price tag, and you’ve quickly got a real bargain on your hands. 

Conclusion

The 214ce DLX is a truly great guitar. In terms of sheer build quality, sound quality, functionality, style and reliability, the guitar is up there with the best. And in terms of price, realistically you’re going to see this guitar listed for a bit less than the RRP would suggest, just like any other guitar.

What’s likely to be the deciding factor in a purchase decision here is you. If you came into this review thinking, “I want to buy a Taylor, is this one the right choice for me?” then the answer is an emphatic yes. It’s a guitar loaded with high-end appeal, if you’ll excuse the layered wood back and sides (which I do). I love it and wouldn’t hesitate to buy one for a second. Rest assured, the DLX sits firmly at the top of Taylor’s 200 Series as the perfect introduction to one of the greatest guitar companies out there.

Taylor 214ce DLX

Martin 000-15M

Understated, incredible value for money, and boldly in fashion; Guy Little has a hankering for the all-‘hog Martin

_MG_2435

C.F. Martin & Co.’s history as one of the world’s leading guitar makers knows no bounds. For over 180 years, America’s oldest guitar brand is a tour-de-force for constantly redefining standards and coming up trumps. Whether it’s a Road Series, or a Custom Shop D-45, when buying a Martin guitar you can’t really go far wrong.

Martin’s first all-mahogany guitar was the 2-17 – an adorable parlour with a slotted headstock – released in the ‘20s. These nimble little powerhouses became trendsetters for blues players because they were loud, bright, sweet – and also cheap. Gibson soon found that this was the way to go and released their L-O mahogany top in the latter part of that decade.

The Martin style 15 then came into being in the ‘40s, and the 000-15M that I have sitting on my knee, with its gorgeous understated looks, is the new trendsetter – for the modern guitar-toting troubadour, that is.

No matter what guitar I’m about to review I always have to get one thing out of the way first – smelling the guitar as I pull it from the case (a hardshell TKL lined with green faux fur, since you ask). The aroma is positively delicious; almost as delicious as the choclately mahogany that’s neatly tucked inside.

The 000-15M continues the 000 Martin 14-fret-to-body size – which is sitting comfortably on my knee as I write this. The first thing you’ll notice are its minimal appointments and simple looks – again, taking inspiration from the earlier guitars from the ‘40s and ‘50s. There’s no binding here at all, only minimal fine lines on the soundhole rosette. The understated appeal of all-‘hog guitars with no superfluous adornments is certainly in vogue at the moment. Ask any luthier and they’ll tell you the same thing – everyone wants mahogany. Whether this is to do with notable players using mahogany more, a resurgence for old-time traditions, or because we’re going all environmentally conscious, I don’t know – but there’s a demand.

_MG_2397

It’s all-solid mahogany for the top, back and sides, as well as the neck. These guitars are US-made, in the same factory as some highly ornate models, and they all share the same build quality of some Martins that dwarf the price of this instrument.

Continuing with the old-style appointments, we’ve got nickel open-geared tuners with butternbean knobs sitting atop the headstock, which has a lovely figured east Indian rosewood headplate. There’s also the Delmar faux tortoise pickguard that sits in with the grain of the 000-15M perfectly. We’ve got a bone nut at the bridge with ebony pins and a string spacing of 2-1/8”. It’s got great all-rounder player appeal. In fact, the only thing that’s a little fancy is the abalone diamond finerboard inlays – an upgrade from the usual dots. The neck is a low oval shape, which fits in your hand perfectly, and would be a welcome addition to someone migrating over from an electric guitar. The satin finish enhances this guitar’s playability – which it was oozing with from the start. It takes very little effort to make this guitar truly sing.

The general look and feel of this instrument is one that’s simple and uncluttered, yet it’s achingly trendy. It has remained faithful to a no-frills approach, not bothering about the flashy looks here. Where Martin could have skimped and gone with laminated tonewoods, we have solid mahogany which tells us one thing: it’s all about tone. Unadulterated, glorious tone.

_MG_2432So I’ve already fallen in love with the looks of this guitar, but will I love how it sounds? First things first: the bracing. Martin has used a simplified A-frame take on the usual X-bracing system with a section that reinforces the bridge plate, with struts made from Sitka spruce which aims to create a tight, bright, and vibrant tone chamber.

When you think of mahogany guitars, you’ll probably think blues; that’s alright, but this 000-15M is so much more. The mahogany produces a clear, articulate, and balanced tone across the entire range; another tick next to the “all-rounder” box. Fingerstyle licks are crisp and punchy as you’d expect (I wasn’t expecting a ‘hog top to be so crisp, actually) but when you strum chords it takes this guitar into a new level of hyper activity, which is why you’ll see so many singer-songwriters wielding one of these. Its sound is perfect for vocal accompaniment and despite its size (which may limit how much force it can take in comparison to say, the D-15M) it’s a loud and bright guitar that covers everything you can throw at it. The tone is lush and warm when you’re playing with your fingers, yet dig in with a plectrum and it’s almost a different guitar. The responsiveness continues when you drop it in another tuning, put a capo on it, pick single notes, strum it, or play lead licks up and down the fretboard. It’s a bold instrument – its demure and understated looks juxtaposed with its bright and lively tone. It almost feels as though it’s jumping around in your hands as you play it, needing taming when you’re digging in, while it dances around gracefully as you pick it.

The one thing this model doesn’t have is an option to plug in. That’s fine, though – if you need that option, then there’s the 000-15ME, which will cost you around 200euro more. That leads us on to the price: 1,490 euro. Well, it’s a no brainer, really. This offers outstanding value for money, with buckets full of tone and playability.

_MG_2424

I am completely enamoured with this guitar. I can’t think of another guitar that won me over so quickly, actually. It’s everything I look for in a guitar: simple, unfussy, great tone, and excellent playability. Oh, and it’s not going to break the bank either. I must mention the strings here, too, because I really think they make a difference. The Martin SP Lifespan Bronze light gauge strings have no squeakiness to them; they feel completely natural, and they sound glorious. You might want to up the gauge if you require that bluesy, slide honk, but they’ll have you covered.

Its appeal is centre stage at the moment with the all-mahogany trend going full-force. It’s uber sexy, no-frills approach makes me covet this guitar unlike many others not just in this price range, but ones that cost a considerable amount more. I’d not think twice about adding this to my guitar collection.

Pros: Wonderfully balanced, articulate and engaging across the whole tonal spectrum

Cons: No binding and no electronics might not be for some

Overall: A sensational guitar that should be a part of every player’s collection

Making of the Audix D6


Randy Jackson TTE800 now in Tallinn!!!


NEW! ACOUSTIC PRO AMP SERIES!

Make every seat the best seat in the house with the Acoustic SFX and Acoustic Pro.

Fender Acoustasonic guitar amplifiers are full-featured amps voiced specifically to deliver full, clear and resonant acoustic sound ideal for everything from powerful strumming to delicate passages. Compact, powerful and great sounding, they’re loaded with tonal innovations and versatile features designed for guitarists who need to take the sound of their acoustic artistry to a higher level.


NOW IT’S YOUR TURN TO CHANGE THE WORLD OF MUSIC


Credit Card payment available!

Credit Card payment now available! LHV Hire-purchase!

PVXmusic.ee webstore accepts all majord credit cards (VISA/Mastercard)! New payment option has also been added to our retail stores .

Martin 000-15M

Understated, incredible value for money, and boldly in fashion; Guy Little has a hankering for the all-‘hog Martin

_MG_2435

C.F. Martin & Co.’s history as one of the world’s leading guitar makers knows no bounds. For over 180 years, America’s oldest guitar brand is a tour-de-force for constantly redefining standards and coming up trumps. Whether it’s a Road Series, or a Custom Shop D-45, when buying a Martin guitar you can’t really go far wrong.

Martin’s first all-mahogany guitar was the 2-17 – an adorable parlour with a slotted headstock – released in the ‘20s. These nimble little powerhouses became trendsetters for blues players because they were loud, bright, sweet – and also cheap. Gibson soon found that this was the way to go and released their L-O mahogany top in the latter part of that decade.

The Martin style 15 then came into being in the ‘40s, and the 000-15M that I have sitting on my knee, with its gorgeous understated looks, is the new trendsetter – for the modern guitar-toting troubadour, that is.

No matter what guitar I’m about to review I always have to get one thing out of the way first – smelling the guitar as I pull it from the case (a hardshell TKL lined with green faux fur, since you ask). The aroma is positively delicious; almost as delicious as the choclately mahogany that’s neatly tucked inside.

The 000-15M continues the 000 Martin 14-fret-to-body size – which is sitting comfortably on my knee as I write this. The first thing you’ll notice are its minimal appointments and simple looks – again, taking inspiration from the earlier guitars from the ‘40s and ‘50s. There’s no binding here at all, only minimal fine lines on the soundhole rosette. The understated appeal of all-‘hog guitars with no superfluous adornments is certainly in vogue at the moment. Ask any luthier and they’ll tell you the same thing – everyone wants mahogany. Whether this is to do with notable players using mahogany more, a resurgence for old-time traditions, or because we’re going all environmentally conscious, I don’t know – but there’s a demand.

_MG_2397

It’s all-solid mahogany for the top, back and sides, as well as the neck. These guitars are US-made, in the same factory as some highly ornate models, and they all share the same build quality of some Martins that dwarf the price of this instrument.

Continuing with the old-style appointments, we’ve got nickel open-geared tuners with butternbean knobs sitting atop the headstock, which has a lovely figured east Indian rosewood headplate. There’s also the Delmar faux tortoise pickguard that sits in with the grain of the 000-15M perfectly. We’ve got a bone nut at the bridge with ebony pins and a string spacing of 2-1/8”. It’s got great all-rounder player appeal. In fact, the only thing that’s a little fancy is the abalone diamond finerboard inlays – an upgrade from the usual dots. The neck is a low oval shape, which fits in your hand perfectly, and would be a welcome addition to someone migrating over from an electric guitar. The satin finish enhances this guitar’s playability – which it was oozing with from the start. It takes very little effort to make this guitar truly sing.

The general look and feel of this instrument is one that’s simple and uncluttered, yet it’s achingly trendy. It has remained faithful to a no-frills approach, not bothering about the flashy looks here. Where Martin could have skimped and gone with laminated tonewoods, we have solid mahogany which tells us one thing: it’s all about tone. Unadulterated, glorious tone.

_MG_2432So I’ve already fallen in love with the looks of this guitar, but will I love how it sounds? First things first: the bracing. Martin has used a simplified A-frame take on the usual X-bracing system with a section that reinforces the bridge plate, with struts made from Sitka spruce which aims to create a tight, bright, and vibrant tone chamber.

When you think of mahogany guitars, you’ll probably think blues; that’s alright, but this 000-15M is so much more. The mahogany produces a clear, articulate, and balanced tone across the entire range; another tick next to the “all-rounder” box. Fingerstyle licks are crisp and punchy as you’d expect (I wasn’t expecting a ‘hog top to be so crisp, actually) but when you strum chords it takes this guitar into a new level of hyper activity, which is why you’ll see so many singer-songwriters wielding one of these. Its sound is perfect for vocal accompaniment and despite its size (which may limit how much force it can take in comparison to say, the D-15M) it’s a loud and bright guitar that covers everything you can throw at it. The tone is lush and warm when you’re playing with your fingers, yet dig in with a plectrum and it’s almost a different guitar. The responsiveness continues when you drop it in another tuning, put a capo on it, pick single notes, strum it, or play lead licks up and down the fretboard. It’s a bold instrument – its demure and understated looks juxtaposed with its bright and lively tone. It almost feels as though it’s jumping around in your hands as you play it, needing taming when you’re digging in, while it dances around gracefully as you pick it.

The one thing this model doesn’t have is an option to plug in. That’s fine, though – if you need that option, then there’s the 000-15ME, which will cost you around £150 more. That leads us on to the price: £1,099. Well, it’s a no brainer, really. This offers outstanding value for money, with buckets full of tone and playability.

_MG_2424

I am completely enamoured with this guitar. I can’t think of another guitar that won me over so quickly, actually. It’s everything I look for in a guitar: simple, unfussy, great tone, and excellent playability. Oh, and it’s not going to break the bank either. I must mention the strings here, too, because I really think they make a difference. The Martin SP Lifespan Bronze light gauge strings have no squeakiness to them; they feel completely natural, and they sound glorious. You might want to up the gauge if you require that bluesy, slide honk, but they’ll have you covered.

Its appeal is centre stage at the moment with the all-mahogany trend going full-force. It’s uber sexy, no-frills approach makes me covet this guitar unlike many others not just in this price range, but ones that cost a considerable amount more. I’d not think twice about adding this to my guitar collection.

Pros: Wonderfully balanced, articulate and engaging across the whole tonal spectrum

Cons: No binding and no electronics might not be for some

Overall: A sensational guitar that should be a part of every player’s collection